THE HAGIA SOPHIA
Turkey

 

Church at the End of Antiquity

Click here for Episode 45

 

It's the story of a farmboy, an actress, an unruly mob, and a bacterium. The Roman Empire evolved, and based in Constantinople, it reached a new golden age under the leadership of Justinian. His success is best seen in the masterpiece church: the Hagia Sophia, or Ayasofya in Turkish.

 

The Hagia Sophia was the greatest cathedral in Christendom for a thousand years, then a resplendent mosque, and now a fully restored museum. But shortly after its construction highlighted the peak of Eastern Roman prosperity, a bacterium came to Constantinople and brought the empire to its knees.

 

Joining me to talk about Justinian, the Hagia Sophia, and the plague is the great Robin Pierson, host of the History of Byzantium podcast. Robin recently visited Istanbul and talks about exploring its Byzantine sites as well as how Turkish food charmed even his palate.

 

There are fish sandwiches to eat and Ratatouille references to enjoy.

 

Sources:

 

Heather, Peter. The Restoration of Rome: Barbarian Popes and Imperial Pretenders

Lonely Planet Istanbul 

Lord Kinross. Hagia Sophia

Norwich, John Julius. Byzantium: The Early Centuries

Paul the Silentiary, Descriptio S. Sophiae

Procopius. The Secret History

Procopius. Wars of Justinian

Rick Steves' Istanbul

Rosen, William. Justinian's Flea: Plague, Empire, and the Birth of Europe

 

Music by Turku, Nomads of the Silk Road from their album Alleys of Istanbul

Photo in public domain

 

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